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Welcome to the 3Rivers Archer's Den

Archer's Den

Welcome to the Archer's Den. Here you will find a gathering of traditional archery stories, tips and techniques, trophy animals taken with traditional bows, and plenty more. Stay a while and learn something. We hope you enjoy and even submit a trophy of your own, or leave a comment on a post.

Tag Archives: Gold Tip

Arrow Tips by Gold Tip: Broadhead Tuning

Gold Tip logo

Arrow Assembly
Broadhead Tuning
Paper Tuning
Bare Shaft Tuning

Broadhead Tuning – Things to Consider:

The more blade surface a broadhead has, the more steering ability it will have. For this reason fixed blade broadheads with large cutting diameters tend to be slightly more difficult to tune.
Although mechanical broadheads tend to have fewer tuning issues than fixed blade heads, they still need to be properly aligned and their point of impact needs to be verified prior to hunting.
Gold Tip recommends test shooting any style of broadheads for accuracy prior to hunting.

Step 1: Bow Tuning

In order to achieve good accuracy with broadheads, it is imperative that your bow be properly tuned. Consult our tuning instructions above and, if needed, consult a technician at your local pro shop for help with bow tuning.

Step 2: Broadhead Alignment

When a broadhead is installed into an arrow shaft, it is common for the broadhead to seat incorrectly on the insert. This will cause misalignment of the broadhead in relation to the arrow and will cause the broadhead to wobble when spun. In order to achieve good accuracy, the broadhead must be centered on the insert in order to spin true on the shaft. To do this, follow the steps below:

1. Using an arrow spinner (like the Pine Ridge Arrow Inspector) place the point of the broadhead against a cardboard box. As you spin the arrow, the point will make a circle if it is not properly aligned. If the broadhead is properly aligned it will not appear to move and no additional steps are needed. (see figure #1)
2. If the point does make a circle, rotate the point to its uppermost point of movement and mark the box with a felt pen at that point. (see figure #2)
3. Rotate the arrow 180 degrees from that point and simply apply pressure to the point of the head on a hard surface. The goal of this is to push the broadhead into alignment with the insert. (see figure #3)
4. Put the arrow back on the spinner and check the head again for alignment. With a little trial and error you will soon become proficient and will be able to align a broadhead to the insert in under a minute. Keep in mind that shooting an arrow can cause misalignment, so it is a good idea to spin your broadhead tipped arrows repeatedly, particularly after shooting them.

Step 3: Fletching

After bow tuning and broadhead alignment, you are now ready to test your arrows for accuracy. If you are experiencing poor accuracy with a well tuned bow and properly aligned broadheads, it is likely that you are not giving the arrow enough guidance. The answer to this is fletching. Increasing the amount of fletching either by using longer vanes, or more vanes (4-fletch instead of 3-fletch) will give better guidance and increased accuracy. Be careful however, as too much fletching can have other adverse effects such as excessive drag than can also hamper performance. The key is finding a happy medium. This may take some trial and error depending on your setup. The best rule of thumb is to use the smallest amount of fletching possible while still being able to achieve field point accuracy with your broadheads.

Figure 1
Using an arrow spinner place the point of the broadhead against a cardboard box.
Figure 2
If the point does make a circle, rotate the point to its uppermost point of movement and mark the box with a felt pen at that point.
Figure 3
Rotate the arrow 180 degrees from that point and simply apply pressure to the point of the head on a hard surface.

Arrow Tips by Gold Tip: Paper Tuning

Gold Tip logo

Arrow Assembly
Broadhead Tuning
Paper Tuning
Bare Shaft Tuning

Paper Tuning

Shoot arrows through a suspended sheet of paper at a distance of 4 to 6 feet and observe the resulting tear. See adjustment illustration below to achieve a perfect tune. Make vertical adjustments prior to horizontal adjustments to avoid getting a false reading due to vane clearance issues.

Although there are a number of acceptable tuning methods that work well, Gold Tip recommends paper tuning for release aid shooters and bare shaft tuning for finger shooters. Gold Tip also recommends the use of a string loop for compound shooters using a release aid. This will prevent nock pinch and will allow for a more accurate setup and more reliable tuning.

Tip from the Pros: Try spraying your vanes with aerosol foot powder to determine if there is any vane contact with the arrow rest. Vane contact can cause erratic arrow flight and inaccurate paper tear readings.

Tip from the Pros: When paper tuning, proper shooting form and a consistent release are critical. Try shooting each arrow a number of times to make sure that you are getting a consistent reading. Paper tuning can be time consuming, but will pay big dividends in accuracy.

Paper Tuning - Perfect tearPerfect Tear

Paper Tuning - High tearHigh Tear
Possible Corrections:

  • Move nock point down
  • Move rest up
  • Shorten arrow length

Paper Tuning - Low tearLow Tear
Possible Corrections:

  • Raise nocking point

Paper Tuning - Left tearLeft Tear
Possible Corrections:

  • Move rest/center shot towards riser (right-handed bow)
  • Use stiffer arrow
  • Decrease draw weight

Paper Tuning - Right tearRight Tear
Possible Corrections:

  • Move rest/center shot away from riser (right-handed bow)

Arrow Tips by Gold Tip: Bare Shaft Tuning

Gold Tip logo

Arrow Assembly
Broadhead Tuning
Paper Tuning
Bare Shaft Tuning

Bare Shaft Tuning

Gold Tip recommends bare shaft tuning for any setup shot with a finger release. In order to use this method you will need two fletched arrows and two bare shafts. Follow the illustrations below  to fine tune your setup.

This diagram depicts optimal tuning for the bare shaft tuning method. Bare shafts and fletched arrows should have very similar impact points.

 

Stiff Arrow when bare shaft tuningStiff Arrow

    Possible Corrections:

  • Use a longer shaft
  • Use a lighter spined shaft
  • Add weight to the insert using Gold Tip weight system, or by adding a heavier weight point

Weak Arrow when bare shaft tuningWeak Arrow

    Possible Corrections:

  • Cut shafts shorter 1/4″ at a time
  • Use a stiffer spined arrow
  • Decrease point weight
  • Add weight to the rear of the shaft

 

Low Nock Point when bare shaft tuningLow Nock Point

    Possible Corrections:

  • Move nock point up
  • Move arrow rest down

 

High Nock Point when bare shaft tuningHigh Nock Point

    Possible Corrections:

  • Move nock point down
  • Move arrow rest up

Arrow Tips by Gold Tip: Arrow Assembly

Gold Tip logo

Arrow Assembly
Broadhead Tuning
Paper Tuning
Bare Shaft Tuning

Arrow Assembly

Gold Tip arrows are not only the best performing arrows on the market; they are also the most user-friendly. With proper care and by adhering to the assembly instructions below you will find Gold Tip shafts quick and easy to assemble in any configuration you desire.

Arrow Cutting

Use only a high speed, abrasive wheel cutoff saw that is designed specifically for cutting arrow shafts. Use of any other method could result in damage to the shaft. It is recommended that your arrow shaft be cut at least one inch in front of the arrow rest at full draw. Arrows that are cut too short can be drawn past the arrow rest which could result in the arrow falling from the string, jamming, or otherwise causing damage to the arrow or the bow, and could even lead to personal injury. Never shoot an arrow that is less than one inch past the arrow rest at full draw.

Tip from the Pros: Try cutting arrow shafts on both ends to improve straightness. Straightness flaws in carbon arrows are typically found on the ends. Cutting both ends will often lead to better straightness and thus, better accuracy.

Installing Inserts

– Read Warning and First Aid instructions on Tip Grip bottle before use.
– Wear safety glasses.
– Do not handle inserts by gluing surfaces as doing so may lead to improper adhesion. Disposable gloves are recommended.
– Use only TIP GRIP adhesive to install inserts. Do not use hot melt glue on carbon arrows.

Step 1: Clean inside of shaft to a depth of 1 inch with clean water on a cotton swab to remove debris. Allow to dry.
Step 2: Apply TIP GRIP adhesive to insert using three generous lines evenly spread and length wise along the flats of the insert.
Step 3: Install insert into shaft and rotate slowly one full turn while doing so.
Step 4: With a clean cloth immediately wipe off any excess glue from the shaft and insert.
Step 5: Allow 24 hours for adhesive to cure before shooting. Shooting before adhesive has fully

Installing Nocks

Gold Tip GT Series and Accu-lite Nocks are designed to fit snuggly without the use of adhesive. Simply press the nock into the shaft and rotate to achieve correct vane orientation.

Gold Tip Pin Nocks and HD Pin Nocks are designed to fit snuggly over a pin nock bushing without the use of adhesive. After following the instructions for installing a Gold Tip pin nock bushing (see below), simply press the nock onto the pin and rotate to achieve correct vane orientation.

Gold Tip Pin Nock Bushings are used in conjunction with a pin nock or HD pin nock. The bushings can be glued in using Tip Grip adhesive or pressed in using plastic or Teflon tape.

Tip from the Pros: Instead of using glue, press your pin nock bushing into the shaft through a piece of plastic grocery bag, or wrap the bushing with Teflon tape prior to pressing it in the shaft. This will allow the bushing to fit tightly without rotating and at the same time, it will allow you to replace the bushing in the event it becomes damaged. If the pin is damaged after being glued in it is very difficult and sometimes not even possible to remove the damaged pin without damaging the shaft. (see photos below)

Nock Install

Nock install

Glue Nock
Glue nock
Glue Point
Glue point
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