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Gordon's Bo-Tuff Fiberglass - Clear
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Gordon's Bo-Tuff Fiberglass - Clear

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Item Number: 4475X
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Price: $23.50 - $26.50
(Depending upon options selected.)
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28 Questions | 63 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    Can I use the bo tuff fiberglass to back a hickory board bow? My plans were to buy a couple hickory boards from you guys and some strips of this fiberglass and just use the fiberglass as a backing. Not back and belly.
    Asked on 10/13/2014 by Nick from Lakevillage Ar

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The backing might over power the belly if the bow is too short for the draw length. When selecting backing material you must consider a material that is equal strength to the backing. I would suggest using a much denser wood to use just a fiberglass backing. Make sure to use Unibond or an epoxy to bind the two together. To maximize the Hickory boards you may want to try doing a pyramid design for your bows.

      Answered on 10/18/2014 by Mountain Cove Bows from San Marcos, TX
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, it's possible to use fiberglass for the backing.

      Answered on 10/14/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi Nick,
      Yes. You can use the bo buff fiberglass to back a hickory board without any problem.

      Answered on 10/14/2014 by Wander from Brazil
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Its possible but be careful the fiberglass is much stronger than the
      hickory and can crush it. Might also be worth considering using
      the hickory as a backing for a red oak board bow. I've had much success
      with this in the past.

      Answered on 10/14/2014 by Darsteed from upstate NY
  • Q:

    If I were to make a 45' reflex deflex laminate bow that is 1' wide with a fiberglass belly and back, what kind of wood would be best for the core? Also would it be better for a solid core or stacked wood laminates?
    Asked on 7/4/2014 by Country from Ft. Polk, LA

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      A lot of different opinions, but I prefer red elm. It seems to recover quicker than some of the other woods that I have used.I would go with "stacked" laminations instead of a solid core.

      Answered on 7/15/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You can use just about any wood for a core with fiberglass back and belly.
      As far as a single or layered it's just an asthetics thing in my opinion.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 7/4/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    will this come out perfectly clear on dark wood using smooth on ea-40 or will there be streaks showing?
    Asked on 5/27/2014 by kdniff from Thayer , Mo

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Generally, it looks very clear when used properly. Not necessarily perfect, but pretty good. However, we can not guarantee how your finished product due to the methods used to finish.

      Answered on 5/28/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It will be near perfectly clear. It will slightly blur fine detail, like
      the subtle grain in wenge wood. Streaking will only happen with a bad glue
      joint, be sure to glue the fiberglass and the wood so there is glue to glue
      contact.

      Answered on 5/27/2014 by Darsteed from upstate NY
  • Q:

    Does grain direction of the wood lams matter as much on a laminated glass bow as to non glass ? Also can red cedar be used as a core wood ?
    Asked on 5/8/2014 by Slim from Alb.NM

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes for both. Grain direction of wood lams matters. It is not a good idea to build a limb with the grain crossing the lenght of the limb.

      Answered on 5/13/2014 by Wander from Brazil
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      No, it doesn't matter because it is backed by the fiberglass.

      Answered on 5/9/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Grain direction usually does not matter at all for the Core wood. Although
      trying to get a 36"x.060 piece we usually don't have a lot of grain
      options. Red cedar is soft enough to run the risk of collapsing under
      pressure or separating from itself. I wouldn't risk using a soft wood
      with all the attractive hardwoods that are available.

      Answered on 5/9/2014 by Darsteed from upstate NY
  • Q:

    Could I use this fiberglass to strengthen a primitive style 72'' longbow? It's a full hickory bow, 35# @28'' and has NO arrow shelf. I am just wanting to add strength and longevity to one of my favorite bows. Thanks!
    Asked on 12/24/2013 by Mik stevens from Arkansas

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      To use this fiberglass you will need to plane the bow down completely flat. Fiberglass will not add a lot of weight, maybe up to 5 pounds.

      Answered on 12/31/2013 by Art from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      No. I would use fiberglass cloth.

      Answered on 12/24/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I'm building a recurve bow at 65" out of juniper (some also call it eastern red cedar) it has a redish Purple Heart wood. I've read that these bows do really well with sinew backing and without it will almost always break at heavier lbs and long draw legths. I have a 31" draw and want a 60-65lb bow. I was curious if anyone can tell me if this would be a good alternative to sinew on the back of the bow or if it would cause checking in the belly? If so is there another option for backing the bow to retain waterproofing as well as see the pretty grain of this wood. Thank you for any and all comments.
    Asked on 12/17/2013 by Calib from Dolores,co

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, as long as the bow is planed flat you can use fiberglass.

      Answered on 1/3/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      31" is a long draw, and at 65" that will put significant stress on your
      bow, so I suggest using some kind of backing. Fiberglass, in my experience,
      works the best, but it is a little hard to work with, and if you don't glue
      it up properly the back of your bow will come out looking shoddy. If you
      don't need to see the wood under the fiberglass, I recommend bamboo
      backing. For fiberglass you'll need the appropriate adhesive, but with
      bamboo you have use Titebond III. I wouldn't mess around here. I've broken
      enough bows to know...but trying out fiberglass could also get you into
      trouble. When I build glass bows I use an air hose and pressure system.
      With bamboo you can just glue and clamp. Good luck!

      Answered on 12/17/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I am building a 72in long bow out of three laminations of hickory. Will applying fiberglass to the back and belly help prevent the bow from taking a set?
    Asked on 8/26/2013 by hombre grande from NC

    3 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes

      Answered on 8/29/2013 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I don't know from experience, but I have been told that will do the trick
      Andrew

      Answered on 8/28/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      yes it should help quite a bit, if you glue in a little reflex you shouldnt
      see any set as the fibreglass wont take a set ever. Glass "could" add 15+
      pounds of draw weight or more depending on how its glued in, so be mindfull
      if its a proven wood design then lower the amount of hickory accordingly.

      Answered on 8/26/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I know you put this on the back of a bow but do you put on the belly? And can this be used as a core?
    Asked on 7/29/2013 by joe

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes you should put it on the belly. Its too heavy for the core though. U
      can use just about any hardwood as a core black walnut, hard maple or
      action boo would be a good first choice. Action boo is basically flooring.

      Answered on 7/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      They are meant for the back and belly of a bow. You will need one strip for the back and another for the belly. I would not recommend for a core piece. They are shinny on one side and rough on the other to be used for the outer layer only.

      Answered on 7/29/2013 by Johnathan Karch from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      use smooth-on epoxy(ea-40) this fiberglass needs to be on the belly and back.applying to one side will put too much strain on the opposite side. it can be used for a core, but it doesn't help. use a nice wood core. you will be able to see the grain through the glass and epoxy.

      Answered on 7/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have used fiberglass on the belly and back of laminate bows but can't say
      if it could be used as a core. I suppose if both sides were rough, not one
      side smooth, then you could. When used on a belly or back the thickness has
      to be figures unto the final draw weight.

      Answered on 7/30/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I have a maple backed red oak bow that I made, but there is a small crack in the maple that occurred after the bow had been finished. If I were to sand off the finish on the back of the bow, would this fiberglass work to stop the bow from breaking?
    Asked on 5/17/2013 by Dave from Hartland, WI

    6 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes, you could back it with fiberglass. It may stiffen the bow some and may need tillering to lighten it back up.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 5/17/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes it can but no guarantee and use rapin
      Sent from my Kyocera Hydro

      Answered on 5/17/2013 by bamboowarrior from mt. pleasent SC
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I would not do that. The best in my experience is to back the whole bow with strap sinew bonded with liquid hide glue. When dry, varnish to keep the moisture out. Incredible how the most problematic bow can be saved with that procedure.
      Tawfiq Ibrahim
      http://independent.academia.edu/TawfiqIbrahim

      Answered on 5/17/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes it will if, the crack is not to sever & does not go off the edge of the bow.
      If it does go off the edge of the bow, first put a tillering string on the bow so the crack opens just a little, then fill it with tight bond 3. Then after the glue has cured, sand it & cover it with fiberglass & your bow should be fine.
      Make sure to use the 2 part, three rivers recommend glue, to glue the fiberglass to the bow.
      Next time you make a bow I highly recommend using hickory as your backing. The longer grain makes it stronger.
      -Joseph Frye
      Bold Archery Design

      Answered on 5/17/2013 by Joseph the bold from Jeffersonville n.y.
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The fiber glass will help for sure but I can not guarantee that will not continue to hold up.

      Answered on 5/20/2013 by Clint from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Using this fiberglass as a backing on your particular bow would likely overpower the belly wood. I would suggest a backing of rawhide or sinew.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 5/23/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I am making a 64" D shaped longbow. I am using a red oak core with cedar laminations. It's all under this clear fiberglass. I needed to know how long my riser should be. I had planed for a 16 inch riser. Is this okay?
    Asked on 1/29/2013 by special kay

    6 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi, My r/d d shaped longbow @ 64" uses a 17" riser. You are in ball park but may have to build a couple. Good luck.
      Ron

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yeah 16 is good for tha riser
      Sent from my Kyocera Hydro

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Should be fine. I'd make sure the ends of the riser are tapered equally thin so that the limbs flex symmetrically. Good luck!
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, 16" should be plenty long for the riser. Since you are making the bow yourself there are not any rules that you have to follow. Though most longbows will have a 15" to 16" riser.

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The longer your riser is, the shorter your limbs will be, unless your bow
      will bend through the riser. Shorter limbs have to bend more and therefore
      they make for a heavier bow. In making a D-bow, I recommend making it as
      with limbs as long as possible to reduce shock and increase flexibility.
      When fiberglass is used properly you get away with very short limbs and a
      very large riser, in some cases bigger than the limbs, but the fiberglass
      needs to be wide.
      There may be a member on here who give a more mathematical explanation.

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi Folks.
      Yes 16 inches riser for a 64 inches long bow is good. Usually the riser size goes from 22,5% to 26,5% of the bow lenght.

      Answered on 2/8/2013 by Wander from Brazil
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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