Visitor Monitoring
blank
blank
Bows>Bow Building>Backing & Lumber
blank
Gordon's Bo-Tuff Fiberglass - Black
blank

Gordon's Bo-Tuff Fiberglass - Black

blank
Item Number: 4474X
blank
Price: $17.50 - $18.50
(Depending upon options selected.)
   This item is Made in the USA    
blank
  
blank
blank
 Width:
 
 Thickness:
 
blank
 QTY   >Add to Cart    Add to Wish List
blank
blank
Full Product Info blank Product Ratings & Reviews blank Ask A Question
blank
blank blank blank blank blank
blank blank

Do you have questions about this product?

get answers from real customers and in-house experts with AnswerBox.

23 Questions | 71 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    I wanted to back a 55# 68 inch hickory bow to protect it and keep it from splitting would you recommend fiberglass backing or something else. Also what is the process?
    Asked on 10/15/2014 by cant shoot straight from mich

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You have many options available to you for backing. If the bow is such that you are not worried about compromising the historical aspects of the piece, then fiberglass is an excellent choice. You can easily back it with glass using (my preference) smooth on epoxy. Keep in mind that you will add significantly to the draw weight of the bow. You will need to tiller the bow to prepare it for backing anyway, so the draw weight of the original bow will be naturally reduced. It is an art to arrive at the desired draw working this way, but well worth the effort ( and sometimes, education). You will need to cure the epoxy at 160 degrees f, to avoid de-lamination of the finished product. You will end up with a bow ready for 1000's of shots and many years of durability
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 10/18/2014 by Anonymous from Missouri
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If the bow is already 55# adding a fiberglass lam only to the back will
      spike the weight and possibly crush the belly of the bow.
      In this case use a linen backing to prevent splitting protect the back.
      You could try a fiberglass cloth as well, although its more
      difficult and I don't know how it would affect the draw. If you don't have
      a set weight already and your goal is 55# you could try
      fiberglass but bamboo would be ideal. As for the process google it, there
      are a lot of good articles.

      Answered on 10/16/2014 by Darsteed from upstate NY
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      For Hickory I've used rawhide and haven't had any issues. You can buy the extra large dog bones at the store for $16/$17 for this. However, you will need to sand them down to about an 1/8" thick other wise your limbs will be too heavy.

      Answered on 10/16/2014 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      You can use several different types of material to back the bow. Fiberglass will work, but I would probably use rawhide.

      Answered on 10/16/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I was tillering out a hinge on a hickory bow and wound up with a lighter bow than I wanted. Can I use the glass on the back only? Or would the hickory backing be more suitable?
    Asked on 5/10/2014 by Morgan from Eastern oklahoma

    2 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The glass, having higher tinsel strength, will help recover your bow's energy better than a hickory laminate on the back. It will also retain that strength longer.

      Answered on 5/13/2014 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      To add more weight to the bow I would recommend to use a Hickory backing. When you put the backing on It will bring the poundage up and you may need to tiller the bow again slightly.

      Answered on 5/13/2014 by Art from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    what is.050 mean on the fiberglass
    Asked on 2/5/2014 by gar from shelbyville tn.

    8 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      0.050 is 5 100ths of an inch or just under 1/16th of an inch

      Answered on 2/13/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It's the thickness of it. Put it in perspective 1/4 of a inch is .250"
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      hey gar i hope this helps! .050 represents the thickness of the fiberglass
      laminate .050 = 50- thousandths of one inch. that also helps educate your
      guess to what poundage the limbs may be by lowering or raising the
      thickness of the fiberglass laminate.

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Joe the bow tuna from Mesquite, Texas 75150
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      .050 is the thickness of the fiberglass

      Answered on 2/6/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      ..5 fiberglass is a measure of the thickness, this the tensile strength of the fiberglass. A thicker glass with yield a stronger drawback on the. For me the the .5 glass has been perfect for all my bows I have made.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 2/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It means the fiberglass is 50 thousands of an inch thick (just under 1/16th
      of an inch)

      Answered on 2/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It's the thickness in inches

      Answered on 2/5/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The .050 on the fiberglass backing refers to the thickness in thousandths of an inch. .062 = 1/16 inch so .050 is a little thinner than 1/16th of an inch.

      Answered on 2/5/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    could one use tite bond 3 to adhere the fiberglass to wood, or is the smooth-on glue the better option?
    Asked on 1/6/2014 by brantley from atlanta, ga

    7 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Smooth-on is your best option tite bond 3 wont work.

      Answered on 1/14/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hello Brantly, In my experience with the two adhesives the smooth on glue
      out performs the TB3, ( tite bond 3) in that type of
      application,(fiberglass to wood). @ 3 Rivers Archery!

      Answered on 1/8/2014 by Joe the bow tuna from Mesquite, Texas 75150
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi, I use neither tite bond 3 nor smooth-on to bond fwith wood and bamboo.I just use common A- B glue- epoxy on the market.And they work well.

      Answered on 1/7/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I myself built a fantastic bow using the same fiberglass that I attached to the maple laminates, I used epoxy and I have had terrific results with that. It has been strong, and created a protective outer coating, I would recommend it.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Smooth-on only, I tried to use others in the past there's really not many
      other suitable glues.

      Answered on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The only proper adhesive to bond fiberglass to a bow is a two-part epoxy like that sold by 3 Rivers. Standard wood glues do not have the shear strength needed to deal with bow stresses. Hide glues will work for sinew-backed bows but Fiberglass needs an epoxy. Best wishes for a successful bow.

      Answered on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Definitely use the Smooth On epoxy. Make sure you tape off the back side of the fiberglass first and then hand sand with 80 grit both the fiberglass and wooden bow parts to be glued. Do not over clamp and squeeze out all the glue. I never even string a bow up until 48 hrs. after using epoxy. That fiberglass can cause bad cuts so be careful of the edges.. Good luck

      Answered on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I have not worked with fiberglass before and I was wondering, what is usually used to finish a bow that has fiberglass laminations in the construction? For my bows I just use whatever wood finish I want, but they are all wood bows, so what would I need to do to make the glass nice as well? I'm assuming that most wood finishes would not work.
    Asked on 12/29/2013 by Wanna be bowyer from Seattle Wa

    7 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      You know what happens when you assume;) You can use the all the same wood finishes on glass same as the wood. Just be mindful of the drips and smears. I use the spray on polypropylene on mine, and it works just fine over the glass.

      Answered on 1/6/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have never worried about the finish on the fiberglass. I polish it with steel wool and then buff it with a polishing compound. It generally looks better than the wood on the bow. On my hunting bows, I just go with steel wool for the dull finish.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 1/4/2014 by Anonymous from Missouri
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi, I used fiber glass with wood and bamboo, and I use whatever finish,paint- which common use with wood and bamboo. All work well with fiber glass. Have fun!

      Answered on 1/4/2014 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The easiest way to seal fiberglass is to first sand all of the luster off the glass with some light sand paper. The luster is just a protective coating put on at the factory. Next wipe the bow down with denatured alcohol and a clean rag. Now you can seal the bow. I like to use our spray polyurethane item number 5611. I prefer to put on 2 to 3 coats letting it dry completely between coats.

      Answered on 12/31/2013 by Art from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      i always use two coats of thunderbird sealer then buff it to a high luster
      if i want a gloss finish.if i want a satin finish i only use 1 coat, but
      sand the bow to 600 grit before u coat it, also do not buff it afterwards.
      you can get it from 3Rivers Archery

      Answered on 12/30/2013 by Joe the bow tuna from Mesquite, Texas 75150
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use a good grade spray on/in the can type urethane. It comes in matte, satin, semi-gloss and gloss finishes. Get the one for exterior use only and I use it for both the wood and the glass at the same time. I leave my glass part taped off with painters blue tape and shoot 2 coats on the wood first, then hit it with 220 sand paper and do another coat, sand again, pull the tape, wipe it down and give it a final coat all over.

      Answered on 12/30/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Most wood Finish's seem to be fine, I personally use either a spray on
      acrylic or polyurethane. Right now I guess I'm mostly using minwax wipe on
      poly.

      Answered on 12/30/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Would this be a suitable replacement for sinew on an asiatic style composite bow? Will the fibreglass stand up to the extreme strain related to this style of bow? I was looking at making 20" long limbs.
    Asked on 7/12/2013 by Pheonix

    3 answers

    • A:

      Yes. Numerous manufacturers use glass in modern reproductions of the Asian style bows. Kassai, Grozer, Atilla, Toth, Kaya, and Samick to name a few.

      Answered on 12/24/2013 by BrokenArrow from The Steppes
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      It would work but it will not be easy to get the glass to follow the contours of the back and belly of the bow. Also with the extreme bending there's a chance stress lines might develop.

      Answered on 7/17/2013 by Dan from 3 Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I think it probably would. It's considerably stiffer than sinew, an may be tough to adhere if you don't have a really even surface. It won't follow the contour like sinew does.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 7/15/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Can u glue one piece of fiberglass to another and if so what glue do you recommend to use
    Asked on 5/29/2013 by Bow hunter from Junction, TX

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I would use Smooth On Epoxy available through 3 Rivers, but first. Thoroughly sand all parts to be joined with 80 grit and then wipe down with acetone prior to applying glue to both surfaces Make sure to smooth out the glue with a squeegee (I use a clean cut piece of card board) and apply even clamp pressure with clamps and backing strips. Good luk

      Answered on 5/30/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes you can I recommend using smooth on epoxy.

      Answered on 5/30/2013 by Clint from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes, use smooth-on epoxy glue.

      Answered on 6/1/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    im making a red oak board bow and want to add these fiberglass lams to the belly and back for increased performance, would i be able to make the belly perfectly flat and have this work without the bow coming out super light?
    Asked on 3/1/2013 by eric

    3 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes you can but you may have to add more layers to tha belly for more draw weight
      Sent from my Kyocera Hydro

      Answered on 3/1/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes! And that sounds like a very good idea.
      I may just have to try that myself. There isnt any good
      Way to get really close to your goal draw weight but
      There are some charts that help. The limbs will have to
      Be pretty thin if you are putting fiberglass on the belly as
      Well. Just be careful to make sure you dont round the edges
      While thinning the lams! Good luck!

      Answered on 3/1/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes, the fiberglass will add a lot of weight to the bow. It should more than make up for any material you will take off of the Oak.

      Answered on 3/1/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I recently made a bow. The draw weight is 15# @ 28". Limbs are 27" tip to fade(26" nock to fade). The bow is 72" tip to tip and 70" nock to nock. The width at the tip is about 1/2". It tapers out to 1 1/2". The taper is 15" from the tip down the limbs. If I added fiberglass to the bow on the back and the belly (removing the current fiberglass tape with titebond) could I expect a significant improvement on the draw weight of the bow? If so, what would could be expected? This was my first bow and hoped it would be closer to 35-45#. If it would get me to the 30ish mark I would be verry pleased.
    Asked on 1/2/2013 by BoldNight the noob from Cleveland, TN

    2 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      BoldNight;
      Yep, re-glassing the bow will change the draw weight, and the lighter .040"
      glass will give the lightest increase. HOWEVER--- the thickness of the core
      lams has a HUGE impact on this. That core should not be over .160" for a 30
      lb bow with .040 glass. (double the core thickness, and you square the draw
      weight)
      I'm heading for .160" core with the .050" glass, and will shave the limbs from
      about 3" beyond the fades to drop it to 50#-55# max on a 64" Pearson-style
      recurve I'm making now. Hope this helps.
      TinHorn
      Redding, Ca

      Answered on 1/3/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      If you add fiberglass to that bow you could see an increase of up to 50#. If you retiller the bow afterwards you should be able to get close to your range.

      Answered on 1/4/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    Is heat always required to glue this fiberglass to wood laminates? Is there another glue besides Smooth On EA-40 one could use?

    Thanks!
    Asked on 12/30/2012 by Sid

    7 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      You don't have to use heat it just helps the bow if you was to get in to some hot weather from delaminating.

      Answered on 12/31/2012 by Clint from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Sid, I've glued on 20 black glass laminates with Smooth on EA-40 and have only had one come undone. Be sure you really rough up the back side of the glsas to get a good bond as well as the surface to which you will laminate. The one that failed was due to the glass being too smooth. Also use painters blue tape on the finish side to keep it protected. Smooth on may seem expensive but I've used it on countless other projects and it's well worth the $ spent. Good Luck

      Answered on 12/30/2012 by half strung from santa barbara
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      There are lots of different epoxy type glues you can use and heat is mot always required. It just depends on what epoxy you use. Some guys have had success going to a local hardware store and using common 2 ton flow mix epoxy. I hope this helps

      Answered on 12/30/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      smooth on will cure eventually without heat, but I would not advise it for bows. My concern would be in storage or in a car with even moderate temperature with windows up etc.. it may de-laminate. I always cure with heat. Taxidermists use it in deer ears and I do some also, but it kind of stats soft or flexible when not heat cured.

      Answered on 12/31/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      This may be a bit late. All epoxies tend to melt at temperatures above their cure temp. It would be a disaster to have your bow de-laminate if you left it in an enclosed auto in the middle of summer. Having a heat box is great insurance. I built mine using backed styrofoam, heat lamps, and a milk barn hot water heater thermostat, (160 degrees) didn't cost much, works great.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 1/1/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      By the way, there is other epoxies but none as good as EA-40. You will save a lot of heartache by going with Smooth-On.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 1/1/2013 by BowHunter from Missouri
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hello. Heat is not always needed. However, Smooth On and several of the other epoxies ordinarily used to bond glass to wood cure faster and with a greater heat resistance when heat is used. This is similar to ceramics. You can, however, allow the epoxy to cure at room temperature. If you do, you should wait at least 24 hours before stressing it in the least.
      There are other epoxies that can be used. West Marine Supply makes a two part epoxy and there are several others. I believe 3 rivers even sells one or more other epoxies that can be used. I think, however, what you will find is that the other epoxies tend to cost more and all work on the same basis as Smooth On. You have to have an epoxy for fiberglass that cures hard, but flexible, and that has high heat resistance.
      Have a great day,
      Michael

      Answered on 1/2/2013 by EnochwalkedwithGod from Ohio
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

Do you have a question about this product? 

blank blank
blank blank blank blank blank
blank
blank
McAfee SECURE sites help keep you safe from identity theft, credit card fraud, spyware, spam, viruses and online scams Click to verify BBB accreditation and to see a BBB report Trust Us Facebook page for 3Rivers Archery YouTube videos for 3Rivers Archery Google+ page for 3Rivers Archery
 
blank
 
 Customer Service    About Us    Product Details    Extra Features    Top Categories
 866-732-8783
 Info@3RiversArchery.com

 My Account 
 Check Order Status 
 Shipping Information 
 Return Policy 
 Privacy Statement 
blank
 3Rivers Archery
 PO Box 517
 607 HL Thompson Jr Dr
 Ashley, IN 46705

 Request a Catalog 
 Learn More About Us 
blank
 Top Searches 
 Gift Certificates 
 Dealer Information 
blank
 Email Sign Up 
 Trophy Room 
 3D Shoots 
 Arrow Whiz 
 Military Discount 
Read Our Blog
blank
 Kid bow sets 
 Recurve bows 
 Longbow bows 
 Carbon arrows 
 Wood arrows 
 Broadheads 
 Youth Archery 
blank
©2014 Three Rivers Archery Supply, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
No part of this web site may be copied or reproduced without the express written permission of Three Rivers Archery Supply, Inc.
3RiversArchery.com
Ask The Experts info@3riversarchery.com Ask the Experts at 3Rivers Archery
Search
Blank space
Order Status Gift Cards Free Catalog Customer Service Sale Items 3Rivers Archery Customer Service and Sale Items
Sign In 3Rivers Archery Welcome and Sign In
($0.00 / 0 items) View Cart at 3Rivers Archery
Background Blank
100% Satisfaction Guarantee 3Rivers Archery 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed
FREE SHIPPING. Use Keycode:  DASHER. No Minimum Order. Black Friday.Shop Gifts