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Bear 58" Grizzly Recurve
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Bear 58" Grizzly Recurve

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Item Number: 2085X
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Price: $359.99
Heavy and/or Oversized  This item is Made in the USA    
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Do you have questions about this product?

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66 Questions | 124 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    What is the best length and weight of arrow to use for this bow?
    Asked on 6/14/2014 by Brian

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      It depends upon the wieght of the bow selected, your draw length, and the weight of the points.

      Answered on 6/16/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use 200 grain field points and ics bowhunter 400 arrows

      Answered on 6/15/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Can a Fast Flight string be used on this bow?
    Asked on 1/19/2014 by Terry from South Carolina

    3 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      No only use dacron with this bow

      Answered on 1/20/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The owners manual for this bow recommends a Dacron Flemish twist. I recall
      reading not to use a Fast Flight string. Something about damaging the tips
      of the bow. I've attached the bear brochure for traditional bows.

      Answered on 1/20/2014 by Mountain Man 372 from Eastern Washington
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use a Dacron Flemish twist on mine... No fast flight .

      Answered on 1/20/2014 by rccl from ct.
  • Q:

    How thick is the strike plate and what height is the riser?
    Asked on 12/13/2013 by Shaen

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The strike plate on the current models are .080 thick but the thickness can be different from one shipment to another. The lenght of the riser is approximately 18 inches long.

      Answered on 12/28/2013 by Keith from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    How much does it weigh? I want a light bow. And is it a good bow for beginners? I want a nice quality bow
    Asked on 11/28/2013 by Ruth the Raider from Toledo, OH

    5 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It weighs 1-2 pounds; very light. It is a great bow for beginners because
      of its smooth draw. I've been hunting and shooting traditional bows for 19
      years and this is my new favorite. As for quality, it is well built,
      efficient and a beautiful piece of craftsmanship. You can't go wrong with
      this bow.

      Answered on 11/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      It weighs in at just over 2lbs by itself. This is a great bow for beginning archers.

      Answered on 11/29/2013 by Dan from 3Rivers Archery
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      1.8 lbs

      Answered on 11/29/2013 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It weights about 3.76 lbs when I strung it. Quality bows are always
      made from Bear. Honestly, a bow for beginners can be broken down
      easily. Arrow shelf is a plus. A Lighter pull bow is more easily shot
      by beginners because of the developnment of strength, consistancy, and
      ease of shooting will be achieved more readily than a heavier bow
      (50#).

      Answered on 11/28/2013 by JoeRN from san diego ca
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It is an excellent bow. I had not drawn a bow for 20 years and was able to start hitting 1' targets at 25 yards after a couple hours of practice. It is also light, doubt it weighs more than 4-5lbs but very durable. I hauled it all over Northern New Mexico for a deer hunt, and it held up very well in challenging terrain. Can't say enough good things about this bow.
      Curtis
      Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone.

      Answered on 11/28/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Is the 40# a good choice for an adult male (155 lbs/5'10") interested mostly in target shooting? If so, specifically which target arrows (length, make, model, item number) should I purchase for this bow in 40#?

    Thank you!
    Asked on 11/18/2013 by Patrick from Maryland, USA

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      40#'s would be a good weight for target shooting. To best fit you with arrows I would recommend to give us a call in here at 866-587-9501 with your draw length and point weight, we can help you further.

      Answered on 11/27/2013 by Art from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I was wondering if this bow is tapped to accept a quiver; specifically, a Kwikee Kwiver? If not a Kwikee Kwiver, than the Bear bow quiver?
    Asked on 11/15/2013 by savagearchery

    6 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The Bear Grizzly is tapped to accept the Bear bow quiver. The Kwikee Kwiver will not work without the AMO sight inserts installed.

      Answered on 11/26/2013 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I took a closer look at my 58 inch grizzly recurve and it does come tapped
      for a quiver. I was mistaken; I have too many bows.

      Answered on 11/23/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      My 58" grizzly did not come tapped for a quiver. I suppose you could use a
      quiver that slides over the limbs. Sorry, I'm not familiar with the quivers
      you mentioned. Hope that helps. It is a great shooting bow though! Happy
      shooting!

      Answered on 11/20/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It does have a place (two threaded holes) you can put a quiver, not sure
      about the specific quiver you mentioned, but it should accept a Bear quiver.

      Answered on 11/18/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      yes,the bear quiver,or any designed like it will fit.The taps are on the right side of the bow.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 11/16/2013 by rccl from ct.
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes....it is tapped 1/4 X 20.

      Answered on 11/15/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I am 6 foot 2" and have a 30" draw . I have a bear Montana and want to soon get a grizzly but is my draw length too long for a kodiak or super grizzly eg the bear grizzly at 58"
    Are they too small for me, also I don't want to get a takedown ?
    Cheers jim
    Asked on 10/13/2013 by Jimmy from Sydney Australia

    4 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      A longer bow would most likely feel easier to pull for you. I would recommend something like the Super Kodiak. However, if you really prefer the shorter bow, it shouldn't be a problem. It just won't feel as smooth as the longer bows.

      Answered on 10/14/2013 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I owned a Bear Grizzly and loved it, and I have a 29.5" draw, it shot great
      for me

      Answered on 10/13/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am 6'3" and have a bear grizzly 60#. I pull 31.25". Overall length has not much to do with pull. You will not find that bow too small for you. Someone of average height (i.e. 5'7"), 8" shorter than I will have a harder time getting to 60# 28" AMO than you or I. Continue to shoot from your desired release point and do not worry about a bow being too small for you. I do not understand your question about a takedown. However, unless you want to customize pull or be able to change limbs, or travel with your bow, a take down is not necessary.

      Answered on 10/13/2013 by JoeRN from san diego ca
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I am 6'5" with a 31" draw and I shoot my grizzly just fine. My favorite bow.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 10/13/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I want a recurve bow that will be able to hunt whitetail deer. I am 5 foot 8 and 125 lbs. should i get a #35 #40 #45? I know a #35 can kill a deer(thats what other sites have said) but i want something that i will not be afraid to not hit the deer in the exact organs from close didtance. i want something that is strong enough to basically kill a deer if hit in a decent spot from meduim range. Thanks for your time.
    Asked on 10/2/2013 by Jack

    5 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      it's all a matter of what you are comfortable with and can shoot accurately

      Answered on 10/13/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If your state has a minimum poundage (40lbs. in 28 inch draw for example) start with that and go from there. good luck.

      Answered on 10/3/2013 by uncle bear from herrin,illinois
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      I would suggest 40# and build up your skills and confidence levels so that you can consistently place your shot where you are aiming. A poorly hit deer can be difficult to recover regardless of the weight of the bow.

      Answered on 10/3/2013 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Your best bet is to probably try a weight that feels most comfortable to
      you. I used to use an old 50's 32# bow then i bought a new 45# bow. I did
      have to get used to the weight difference, but your muscles do eventually
      get used to it. Out of the people i know 40-45# bows do seem to be the
      typical average weight for hunting deer with a recurve bow. I hope this
      helped a little.

      Answered on 10/2/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      If you are 5'8" and 125 pounds, you might have a better chance utilizing a
      bow with sufficient power per poundage that you can pull be easily. In
      hunting, it is always placement of the shot and not the strength of the
      bow. I would shoot for middle of the road and get a 40# bow. It will allow
      you to draw the bow sufficiently enough. You might however, pick up a 40
      pound weight and pull it back with your back and shoulders to see how
      easily you can draw the weight, considering you are pulling 1/4 of your
      weight. Side note, I shot a cotton tail rabbit from 29m away with a 60#
      bow. Arrow went through his back, underneath his spine, just behind the
      front legs. He jumped and ran away. I later found him dead, but none the
      less, my shot was only slightly off and occupied my evening looking for
      him. Not poundage, placement. No strength, its accuracy.

      Answered on 10/2/2013 by JoeRN from san diego ca
  • Q:

    Any idea about when you will be getting the 40# grizzly back in stock
    Asked on 8/29/2013 by oOstriderOo from MA

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      clink on the item then enter your email address where it says notify me when this item is back in stock and we will notify you

      Answered on 8/29/2013 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I recently bought a bear grizzly recurve and I worked on the brace hight . So there wouldn't be any hand shock I started at 7 in all the way through 10 in . When i got to 10 in It changed a little but there was a significant amount of hand shock still. I'm pretty sure if i went to 10 1/2 in it would be reasonable. I would like to know if bear archery would do something about this if i called them. Also if i would leave it at 10 in brace height will lt make me loose speed and energy?
    Asked on 7/25/2013 by Bow hunter from Junction TX

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Honestly I wouldn't know I haven't had that problem with any of their bows, I would call bear and ask what they would recommend. I also wouldn't have a brace height more than 8-1/2 inches as recommended by bear. I would think it would be harder on the bow especially if you have a longer draw length, which I assume would eventually weaken the bow. More so if you are shooting too heavy of an arrow. Sorry I couldn't help.

      Answered on 7/25/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      First, you should keep the bow’s brace height within the manufacturer’s
      recommendations. The Bear Grizzly’s recommended brace heights are 7 1/2 “
      to 8 1/2”. A seven inch brace height is too low and a ten inch brace height
      is WAY too high. In general a higher brace height will result in slower
      arrow speed since you are not pulling the bowstring back as far with a
      higher brace height in comparison to a lower brace height. However, since
      the recommended brace height variance is only one inch (7 ½” vs. 8 ½”) the
      difference in any arrow speed would probably be minimal. The Grizzly is a
      light weight (physical weight, not draw weight) bow. This makes for a bow
      that is easier to carry in the field all day but it does mean that you may
      feel a bit of hand shock regardless of what brace height you use. Bows with
      heavier riser sections tend to have less felt handshock as the extra weight
      of the bow absorbs the residual energy left in the bow upon arrow launch
      (handshock). You could try to increase the weight of your Grizzly by adding
      a bow mounted arrow quiver. This MAY reduce the felt handshock. Good luck.

      Answered on 7/25/2013 by Scowler from Maryland
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I think the recommended brace height is between 7 1/2 and 8 1/2 inches. I have had best results at 8 inches. You are very definitely reducing the power and efficiency of the bow by going with a brace height of 10 inches. When I first received my Grizzly, I was shocked by the savagery of the hand shock. I have another recurve and a couple of longbows, and I have never felt hand shock as severe as what I experienced with the Grizzly. The pain made me not want to shoot the bow.
      But, I am stubborn, and shot the bow despite the pain. Meanwhile, I ordered a B50 Flemish twist string for the bow. I don't know what kind of Flemish twist string came on the Grizzly, from the factory, but I have to assume that it was a fast flight string, because it had no give, no feel, and I hated it. The B50 string is polyester, I think. At any rate, the B50's stretch about an inch, during your first long shooting session, and then they never stretch any more. Fast flight strings, supposedly, provide more arrow velocity, but, to me, they have the feel of steel cable or piano string. I hate them.
      Since switching strings, I have, occasionally, felt some hand shock, probably as the result of gripping the bow too lightly. Other than the occasional shock, caused by my poor technique, hand shock has not been an issue since switching strings. In fact, I had forgotten about hand shock, before receiving your email.
      Try a softer string. It worked for me. At worst, the experiment will cost you $15 or #20. I ditch all of the factory strings on my bows and replace them with B50's.

      Answered on 7/26/2013 by Lonesome Dave from Fredericksburg, Virginia
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes it will cause the bow to shoot slower. I would weigh down your arrows to stop the hand shock.

      Answered on 7/31/2013 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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