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Douglas Fir Wood Shafts
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Douglas Fir Wood Shafts

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Item Number: 0422X
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Price: $36.75
   This item is Made in the USA    
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 Spine:
 
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11 Questions | 24 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    I am planning to make some primitive arrows and was wanting to use these. Is it possible to cut a notch out for the arrowhead and a self nock on the opposite end?
    Asked on 3/30/2014 by Shea

    4 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes I do recommend reinforcing them with with thread sinew

      Answered on 3/31/2014 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Hi,
      I don't know if the wood is hard enough to hold together for a notched arrowhead. The nock at the other end ought to be fine. Best thing to do is try it out.

      Answered on 3/31/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes! it is very easy to cut a notch in these. Try using a few hacksaw
      blades together, or the way i cut them is by simply using a small file and
      wasting the wood away into the perfect notch. Make sure to go across the
      grain for the arrow head or you will split these after a few shots.

      Answered on 3/31/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes. You will need to wrap below the arrowhead and the nock with thread to
      keep the shaft from breaking.

      Answered on 3/30/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    What is the average weight of these safts in 80-85 spine?
    Asked on 5/8/2013 by The Outdoors Man from Badger MN.

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      I took a dozen from the shelf, weighed each one, and they averaged out to 477 grains. There is no guarantee for the weight on these shafts.

      Answered on 5/9/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    spine?
    Asked on 4/26/2013 by leon from fl

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      You choose what 5# increment you want using our drop down selections. First choose what "Diameter" you want, then spine is available to choose.

      Answered on 4/27/2013 by Johnathan Karch from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Depends on bow draw weight
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 4/29/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Is it possible to get 37" wood shafting?
    Asked on 1/13/2013 by wessanator

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      No 32'' is the industry standard.

      Answered on 1/15/2013 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I am shooting a 55# recurve with about a 29.5 draw lenght. Can you help me with the spine weight and what lenght to cut these shafts?
    Asked on 12/30/2012 by headlocked

    5 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      What spine you will require will depend a lot on the make of your bow, string material and how the riser is cut. Unfortunately, the standard equation for calculation of required spine (see below) is no longer valid for the typical recurve of today: it only gives you a minimum spine requirement that is likely to be as much as 20# lower than what it will take to get good arrow flight.
      The equation is based on a 28" arrow, so for a 55# bow you would start with 55# spine; but you must add 5# of spine for each additional inch beyond 28" arrow length (length being valley of nock to back of point, not to point of your broadhead or field point) (subtract 5# for each inch under 28"). With a DL of 29.5" you will want a 30.5" arrow (at least 30.25"), so add 12.5# for an arrow longer than 28" (2.5" x 5#). So now you are up to 67.5#.
      Have a FF or comparable "low-stretch" string?: add another 5# - my guess is that the low-strand-number FF-like strings (usually 8-12 instead of 16 or greater used 10 years ago) require even more arrow spine.
      If you will use more than a 125 gr BH or FP, add another 5# for each additional 25 gr.
      Now comes that most problematic issue: How your vertical shelf is cut on your bow riser. Older recurves were not cut to center or past center and required a weaker-spined arrow to "bend around" the bow as the it was released (archer's paradox). Newer bows, made of much stronger/efficient material, are now typically cut to center and usually further, especially if you have a costom bow (on a bow "cut to center" the string will line-up vertically with the edge of the riser that your arrow rests on). Also, modern bows are made with limb materials that give the bow much better cast, i.e., a 55# bow of today will throw an arrow of a given weight much faster/farther than one of yesteryear. This all requires a healthy increase in spine!
      My guess is that the "equation" was most applicable to POC shafts; if you are using a heavier wood, such as Douglas fir, this will probably require some additional spine.
      To give you an example, my 65# recurves (Schafer Silvertips) are cut past center and I use a 12-strand FF-like string, and arrows 30.5", with 125-gr heads. I use Doug fir shafts. Based on the old equation I would require an arrow with a spine of 82.5#:
      65# +12.5# (for 2.5" beyond 28" arrow length)+5# (for FF string) = 82.5#
      In reality, however, the best spine group (after much trial and error) for my bows is 100-110# (one good thing about bows cut past center is that they will generally shoot a broader spine group than the traditional 5# range).
      The other thing you have to be careful about is how the shafts/finished arrows you are buying have been spined!!! The above is based on the traditional method (AMO?) of the amount of deflection (bend) in the shaft when a 2# weight is placed on it in the middle when the shaft is resting on 2 points 26" apart. It is important also that the grain of the shaft be aligned with the force of the weight (i.e., vertical when being spined, perpendicular to bow string when nocked). What you want are shafts that have been "hand spined" in this manner (usually sold as premium" shafts, but make sure you check). I just sent back 2 doz fir shafts that obviously were not (machine spined?) that came in 10-20# under what I ordered. Also, if you ordered shafts that are tapered on the last 8-10" of the nock end down to 5/16", be aware that the spine measurement is usually what the shaft was BEFORE tapering. Such tapering, while improving clearance of the shaft when shot out of your bow, reduces your spine 8-10#! So order extra spine if you are going to have them tapered.
      In summary, based on my experience, when using wood shafts for the first time out of a bow, it is important to first order a set of test arrows that cover a range of spines, usually in 5-pound increments. For the info you gave me (without knowing your string material, how your shelf is cut and the weight of your points) for a minimum of 67.5# spine, I would use a range that starts at at least 70# (probably 75# is too low unless you're using an older bow), and extends to 95 or 100#, especially if your bow riser is cut past center and you use a FF or similar string (of course do not use such a string unless your bow was made for the added stress of these strings). If you have a custom bow, it is a good idea to ask the bowyer what he suggests for his bows.
      Sorry to make this so complicated, but as you probably guessed I had to learn the hard way. Once you find your "sweet spot" when it comes to spine, wood arrows shoot like darts, and they're all I use.
      Jeff Sample

      Answered on 12/31/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I also have a 55# recurve (Bear grizzly) and love it. I just cut mine 1
      inch past my draw length (because of how I measure) to give room for the
      broadhead to not contact the riser, and got 23/64 55-60 spine weight, it
      was just what I was looking for. As the saying goes, "better to be
      over-spined than under-spined" and have a shaft stab you with 55#'s of
      force.
      -Brian

      Answered on 12/30/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Honestly I'm not sure, this is the first time I've used fir shafts, I've
      always shot cedar. I would assume though that 55-60 lb spines would do you
      just fine. And although I know some guys put a LOT of stock into the spine
      of their arrows, I think it's probably more important to practice a lot
      than to have absolutely perfect tackle. The indians did alright with
      sticks, after all, but that's just a personal opinion.
      Hope that helped a little bit.
      -Gabe

      Answered on 12/30/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      I would shoot a 60-65 and leave the arrows full length with a 125 grain point on them.

      Answered on 12/31/2012 by Clint from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Sorry for the delay in responding.  I haven't made arrows in a couple of years
      and am just now starting back, so I'm not the most experienced arrowsmith to
      ask.  But I would provide the following comments regarding how I make arrows:
      With regard to arrow length, I cut my arrows about 1 1/2 inch longer than my
      draw length for target arrows and 2 or 2 1/2 inches longer for hunting arrows. 
      The 1 1/2 inches is for the point bevel (approx 1 inch) and the knock bevel
      (approx 1/2 inch).  I give an extra half inch or so for hunting arrows so the
      broadhead does not "bump" the sight window upon full draw.  With target arrows,
      which is what I mostly cut, I don't have to worry if I overdraw a little bit
      since the field point will just slide onto the sight window.  For you that would
      mean you would cut your arrows at 31 inches for target or 31 1/2  or 32 for
      hunting.  The extra 1/2 or 1 inch will effect that spine weight needed for the
      arrows.
      In terms of spine weight, the 3 Rivers Archery website provides a nice table to
      calculate spine weights.  The other piece of information you need to determine
      is the weight of the point you are shooting.  I pretty much stick with 100 gram
      tips or 125 grams for hunting.  Combining the shorter arrows and lower tip
      weight for target arrows versus hunting arrows, you may well have different
      spine weight arrows for target and hunting.  Last note, the old
      table/calculation I used to use game me significantly lower spine weights so I
      tend to use the lower end of what the 3 Rivers Table provides.  Using the table,
      you would fall between the 60-65 spine weight and the 65-70 spine weight.  As
      mentioned, since this table appears on the high-end to me, I would go with the
      lower weight (60-65 pounds) for target arrows for sure.  For hunting, especially
      for heavier broadheads, I might choose the heavier spine weight (65-70 pounds).
       Michael

      Answered on 1/3/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Would the stiffer spine weight of these shafts (110#-120#) be safe to shoot in your warbow?
    Asked on 12/1/2012 by lovetobrew from Minneapolis, MN.

    5 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Yes they would be fine to shoot in my warbow

      Answered on 12/1/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Yes you would be able shot theses off of that bow.

      Answered on 12/3/2012 by Clint from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I would not use them in a 110-120 warbow. That's just my opinion, not that it can't work, but I shoot mine in a 60# Hungarian recurve and the velocity makes the arrow difficult to control. I shoot 13/32 shafts out of my bow. I also fletch medieval arrows which adds considerable weight to the arrow. I also understand that a 60# recurve is the equivalent to approximately a 70-80 long bow; so, my bow is still considerable weaker than a 110-120.
      Hope this helps!
      Adam
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 12/1/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have not tried the ones I bought yet, I imagine they will work but with significantly more hand shock. It's not just about the spine but about the mass of the arrow itself. Go for a heavier arrowhead and it should be fine. The spine means the arrows will be safe to shoot, you'll just have to judge whether or not you're comfortable with the amount of handshock, if it is too much it may indicate that it may not be good for your bow. Unfortunately I don't have first hand information for you and you won't know for sure without a purchase. That being said, I'm comfortable enough to try it on my #105 warbow.

      Answered on 12/1/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      That spine would be safe to shoot in about any bow they are so stiff...the problem would be if they are too stiff not getting accuracy and a limit in cast. Given the warbow is not centershot which normally requires a slightly less stiff spine than recurve for same weight....it should work. If too stiff you can increase point weight...if too weak you can cut 1/4 inch of length to stiffen it up a little. Good luck
      Ron

      Answered on 12/1/2012 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Are these shafts already sealed?
    Asked on 12/26/2011 by Anonymous

    1 answer

  • Q:

    IM GOING TO MAKE SOME PRIMITIVE ARROWS. I WONT BE ACTUALLY BE SHOOTING THEM. IM JUST TRYING TO FILL A DEERSKIN QUIVER I HAD MADE AND USE THEM AS A DISPLAY IN MY LIVING ROOM. SO, I DONT THINK I NEED TO BUY THE BEST SHAFTS.i WAS THINKING OF THE SPRUCE SHAFTS AS THEY ARNT TO EXPENSIVE AND IM GOING TO FILE THE KNOCKS ON AS THE INDIANS DID.WHAT DO YOU THINK.
    Asked on 11/24/2011 by CHUGACH from ALBURTIS PA

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Just about any of the shafts will work with what you are wanting to do.

      Answered on 11/25/2011 by Shawn from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    Do the shafts come in 11/32?
    Asked on 10/22/2011 by Anonymous from Grants Pass, OR

    1 answer

  • Q:

    what size nock should i use on 23/64 shafting?
    Asked on 6/25/2011 by flinter from Aberdeen, Washington

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      You should use the 11/32 nocks. Nobody makes a 23/64 size nock.

      Answered on 6/27/2011 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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