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Steel Glue-On Field Points
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Steel Glue-On Field Points

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Item Number: F221X
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Price: $4.99 - $30.99
(Depending upon options selected.)
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19 Questions | 56 Answers
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »
  • Q:

    What glue do you recommend for tips & knocks
    Asked on 4/1/2014 by AJ from Florida

    9 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Bohning Ferr-L-Tite Point Glue Item Number: 4191 for points and Duco for nocks.

      Answered on 4/3/2014 by Sam from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have used Ferrl-Tite for decades for both. I like the fact you can
      "un-glue" easily with heat. Plenty strong for my needs...

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by JB from Alpharetta, GA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I use Gorilla Super Glue. It's waterproof and sets up in about 15 seconds, which is great for field repairs.
      -- Original Message -----

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by The Elder from Staten Island, NY
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      i use the bohning ferr-l-tite hot melt adhesive

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by bear from texas panhandle
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Points/tips- Bohning hot melt
      Nocks- Duco

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have used Bohning Ferr-L-Tite Point glue almost exclusively so far. Some of the newer point glues might have better elasticity and work better in colder temperatures, i.e. Hot Melt Point Glue.Hope that helps.Denis

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I shoot wood arrows and glue directly to the wood. No extra weights or inserts. For points and broadheads, I use hot melt glue. Just make sure all surfaces are hot and clean. And press down half a minute or so to get a good bond. For nocks, I use Duco Cement. Neither have failed me yet. Good luck.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by Batture Bowman from Jefferson, LA
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I prefer the two part epoxy for my points. Easy to use, dries fast, and works well.

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Ferr-l-tite if you are using steel glue on points, hot melt glue is a little bit difficult for nocks because it can not be reheated or you will damage the nock. In the past, I have just used superglue, epoxy, fletchtite etc.

      Answered on 4/1/2014 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    I hve 11/32 shafts and i bought the 11/32 points, they will NOT go onto the shafts at all, i have a 5 degree taper on it and it will not go on, what size should i use?
    Asked on 2/6/2013 by Jonathan Michelin from NorthWest River, NL

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      11/32...are you sure they sent the correct points...should say on the side. Front taper is longer than rear taper....are you using the correct end of taper tool? 5* for points and 11* for nocks...I have never had an issue....they will be tight around neck but will fit... be sure the glue is generous, and you have pliers to hold the tip...then twist it back and forth to seat on shaft. Then I turn it point down on a hard piece of wood or metal and press while spinning between my hands to work out air bubbles and ensure it goes on true.....keep working if you got the right size it will go on..
      Ron

      Answered on 2/6/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      hey there,I am no expert, but i have had this same problem...just burnish, or compress the end of your arrow to fit the point.just rub a hard metal, screwdriver shaft (example) over the end of the shaft in a uniform way to compress the wood? until the shaft fits into the taper cutting tool...hope that helps.Heid the amateur archer....

      Answered on 2/6/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Heat the field point up before pushing it onto the taper. The heat will help to compress the wood.

      Answered on 2/7/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The short answer is: I don't know. As I recall, mine worked with no problem. Look at your points and shafts closely, and see if you can figure-out the problem. Is the point the wrong diameter, or is the socket too shallow, or does it have the wrong taper?
      Good Luck!
      -- Chuck

      Answered on 2/8/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Which size of these Glue-On Field Points would be preferred to use with the 2117 glue in adapters. There are no 21/64 sizes available here. Maybe some sort of ring to smooth the transition from point to shaft? I don't want to maul up the targets.
    Thanks, Ribeye.
    Asked on 1/29/2013 by Ribeye from Buford, Georgia.

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have always used 11/32 field points on all my shafts no matter if swaged Easton 2219, inserts into same 2219 shafts, or 11/32 and 23/64 woodies.
      Ron

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The adapters have a 11/32 taper on them. You will need to use a 11/32 point.

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      use the 11/32. It will fit the 2117 adapter and you will barely notice the 1/64 overlap.

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      11/32 should work fine on the standard 2117 glue in BH adapter.

      Answered on 1/29/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    How do you determine which grain to use? Is their a chart for what grain to use depending on draw weight or length.
    Asked on 12/21/2012 by First Time Boyer from Sanford, FL

    6 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The weight of the point affects the spine of the arrow. More weight up front will weaken the shaft in flight. You will need to use which ever point gives you the best arrow flight.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I don't know of any chart or recommendations regarding the grain weight to
      use. A heavier weight will be better for hunting with better penetration
      but have shorter range. Lighter may be better for target if you want
      longer range. Probably the most important thing is to select a weight to
      use and then make sure ALL your arrows end up constructed the same way and
      the same weight otherwise you are going to throw off your accuracy.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It depends a lot on preference and arrow weight. My recommendation is to go with a 125gr.

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I don't know of such a chart. There are lots of interacting variables: type of bow, draw weight, draw length, shaft length, shaft stiffness. I shoot a light recurve, so typically I start with the lightest point available for a given shaft diameter.
      Good luck!
      -- Chuck

      Answered on 12/21/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Your arrows spine typically determines the weight you need up front. I make arrows a good bit, and the combination of what the bow wants and the spine of the arrow determines what you place on your arrows for that bow. When I make a set of arrows, I never cut the shaft until after they are finished completely. Sometimes, I do not ever cut them if they fly like darts out of one of my bows. Just because you have a 28.50" draw, that doesn't mean you need to cut your 32" inch arrows down to your draw. Once I completely finish the arrows, I always start out with 125 gr. field points to start shooting and tuning them to a bow I want to shoot very accurately. If the arrows show a weak spine coming out of that bow, I will switch bows to see if they shoot better from one of my other bows. If I specifically want them for a particular bow, I will then only work with that bow. So, if the 125 gr. points show a weak arrow coming out of the bow, I will go change the points out and place 100gr. Points on them. This will stiffen a weak spined arrow some what. If the 125 gr. points show a stiff spine, I will change the points on the arrows to 145gr. Points, as this will weaken the spine of the arrow. Lets say my arrows show a weak spine at 125 grains. I remove the points and place 100 gr. points on them. I then go shoot the arrows a few dozen times to see if they are consistent in what they are doing . One of two things will generally happen. Either they will move closer to the bullseye, or they will still continue to show a weak spine. If it is weakness, I will remove the 100 gr. points, and then place 85 gr. points and shoot again. This is making the spine stiffer. If they hit pretty close to where I am looking consistently, this is where the fine tuning will come into play. Okay, now I have them going where I want them to go, but 85 grains is going to be too light of a field tip or broad head to shoot. So, lets say I want to shoot a 125 gr. head out of out of my bow because I also want to go and hunt too. We now know that the 85 grains are shooting great, but I need the heavier 125gr. Tip. This is where you may want to start removing the wood from the tips of the arrows. I do this at a 1/4 inch increments. This way you can you can slowly move the arrow back to the place where you are looking on the target. It will also keep you from taking too much wood off your arrows because you have been told that you have a certain draw length. It takes a great bit of time, but you will come to understand arrow dynamics and your bow much better when you begin working with arrows and trying to make them shoot like darts. I buy field points from 85gr. to 175gr. For setting up my arrows to bows. I have never shot any bows with weights over 150gr. on the front of them for target or hunting. Anything over that I believe you are just stealing kinetic energy. I have and have shot bows up to 80 lbs. and for me anything over 55-60lbs. Is overkill. But to each his own. If you have more questions feel free to ask.
      Sent from my iPad

      Answered on 12/22/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Grain weight is basically a matter of personal preference however a heavier weight will give you more penetration. You can also use heavier or lighter weight to tune your arrow flight.Black Widow Archery has an excellent booklet on tuning your arrows to your bow.

      Answered on 1/25/2013 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    You answered an earlier question with: "The diameter and weight is stamped on the outside of the points so it can be seen when mounted. As for a 3/8" arrow shaft, I would use the 23/64" diameter points as they are the biggest we stock. They will still show some of the taper on the shafting, but they will be the closest fit."

    Who makes a 3/8" glue on field point and why did you choose not to stock it? Will you stock it in the future? I might settle for the 23/64", but I really would like the right size. Please bear with me I am a newbie.
    Also I was wondering which grain weight would be best for my bow. I shoot a 50# recurve with 3/8" by 32 1/4" oak arrows. Thank you for your time.
    Asked on 10/23/2012 by Robin_Hood from AR

    2 answers

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Arrows are made in 3 standard sizes 5/16 11/32 and 23/64. Anything outside of that is most likely a doll rod. Make sure you have the correct spine or it could snap and go into your arm, leaving you with a serious injury.

      Answered on 10/24/2012 by Dave from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      It really depends on how your arrows are flying. If your arrows are flying well then keep using the weight you currently have installed. If you have never shot the bow with these arrows then there are some considerations:
      - first, I think your arrows are too light and will end up being an issue.. Most recommend 7-8grains per pound for an arrow for given bow weight. With your 50# I assume recurve shooting at at least 28 inches as you never mention your draw length...that is around 400grain arrow needed to ensure enough mass to absorb energy from bow without affecting its possible integrity. I would weigh your shafts once finished and fletched and ready to go and start there.
      - a good starting weight is always 125 gr...the defacto standard that many start with and continue with their entire traditional life. If after you mount the 125 gr heads you need to shoot arrows with consistent form and determine if they are weak spine, strong spine, or just right....and also that your nocking point is set properly. Once you get your arrow flying as good as you can (check out shaft tuning videos on 3Rivers or elsewhere).....then you have choices. You can increase dynamic spine by shortening the shaft length in 1/4" incrememnts.....and you can decrease the same spine by adding weight to front of shaft.
      - most have a bow they have shot....a head weight they want to use...and then buy their shafts based on 1-bow weight at given draw length, 2-draw length plus 1/2"-1" added to shaft, 3-weight of fieldpoint/broadhead.....as these three factors affect the spine of your arrow and how close you will be in getting good arrow flight doing nothing else.
      Adding the point after already buying some very small diameter shafts is doing it backwards.
      What spine are the shafts you currently have? If you draw 50# @28 inches and have a 125gr point...I would recommend as a starting point around 55-60# spine weight for my arrow shafts. If you have that then you are starting in right direction. If those shafts spine much lower in weight with I suspect....then might want to start over. Without seeing you shoot and knowing your draw length at full draw and not knowing the spine of the arrow shafts it is nearly impossible to fathom a guess.
      Ron

      Answered on 10/24/2012 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    What diameter would I want if I were to use these for the heat tempered bamboo shafts?
    Asked on 10/19/2012 by Jake

    4 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I have made quite a few bamboo shafted arrows in the past year or two and
      one of the main disadvantages to bamboo is that its diameter is not
      consistent within matching spine weights. I typically buy lots of 100
      shafts, 50 to 55 spine weight. The diameter has never been consistent.
      For the most part the 50 to 55 spine weight shafts will be about the right
      size for the 5/16 arrow points you show here. Most will work, some wont.
      Shane

      Answered on 10/19/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      Most of the time a 5/16 field point will work with a bamboo shaft. The diameters fluctuate from shaft to shaft, so there is no one point size that will work for all of them.

      Answered on 10/20/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The shafts vary in size, so you may want to by a pack of each size if you want to get your arrows properly tuned. A properly tuned arrow will fly straight as long as each component matches the arrow.
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 10/20/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Probably 11/32. Check the diameter on your shafts first. I use a drill guide to check. Good luck.

      Answered on 10/21/2012 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    Do these have the deep taper or are they a more shallow taper?
    Asked on 8/23/2012 by David from Eugene, Oregon

    8 answers

    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      These should have the standard taper found on all general taper tools.
      ~ Marc

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by bowyer1 from Durham, NH
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Shallow depth
      Sent from my iPhone

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      Shallow taper,... I just sanded (tapered) up a dozen arrows yesterday. The half dozen I did for the steel field tips in question were rather short, maybe 3/4-1". If you are doing your own tapering, just keep your tip close and do your taper little by little until it fits then do the remainder the same. The broadheads I tapered for the second half dozen had a much longer taper almost sanding to a point at the tip of the wood.

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      They have the same standard taper as any broadhead.

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by Anonymous
    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The taper on these points is 3/4".

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      The ones I received are shallow tapper and do not seat as accurately as the deep tapper, nor do they stay on as well. Having said that, they are still an acceptable choice, but I do prefer the deeper tapers.

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by chief running deer from Mission BC
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      I'd call them deep: the taper in a 23/64" point is about 7/8" deep.
      -- Chuck

      Answered on 8/23/2012 by Anonymous
    • VERIFIED BUYER

      A:

      As far as we know, these are the deep taper but we're certainly not experts.

      Answered on 8/26/2012 by Anonymous
  • Q:

    When ordering a pack, either dozen or hundreds, do 5/16ths field points come with any kind of glue?
    Asked on 7/20/2012 by pat

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      No, the points will not come with any adhesive. I recommend the Fer-L-Tite. It is a hot melt glue that works well for mounting points.

      Answered on 7/20/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    Where can I get a 135 or 130 grain field piont?
    Asked on 6/28/2012 by stickslinger

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      We do not carry any points in that size. If you are worried about the 5 or 10 grains then I recommend using a nail. You should be able find a small nail of about that weight. You can put the nail into the end of the shaft and glue the point on over the top. This would get you closer the the weight you want.

      Answered on 6/29/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
  • Q:

    I bought 11/32" diameter wooden hunting arrows, 23/63" steel field points, and a 23/64" size arrow taper tool. I find that the tapered arrow does not fit all the way into the field point (it seems to fit snugly, but the shaft does not fill the field point completely. Should it fit all the way down, and if so should I just taper further by hand? Or should I just glue it on however it fits now?
    Asked on 3/4/2012 by Jon from Boston, MA

    1 answer

    • Staff Reviewer

      A:

      The shaft should fit snugly into the point. When you heat the point up to melt the glue it condenses the wood and gives you a perfect fit.

      Answered on 3/5/2012 by Justin from 3Rivers Archery
Displaying questions 1-10Previous | Next »

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